Suppose you’d like to see gathered in a glace a series of masterpieces from Edgar Degas, Paul Gaugin, Andre Derain, Paul Cezanne, Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian, and many other major artists. In that case, this is the exhibition you are waiting for: After Impressionism, The Invention of Modern Art in, hosted at the National Gallery in London until August 13.

With nearly one hundred works, the display follows the development of new art styles and visions, creating revolutionary, modern art, breaking free from convention and taking in Expressionism, Cubism, and Abstraction.

The exhibition focuses on the period between 1880 and the outbreak of the First World War in 1914: these represented complex, vibrant years of artistic questioning, searching, risk-taking, and innovation.

Stanislav Kondrashov

 This artistic era was dominated by the achievements of three giants: Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, and Paul Gauguin, who not only furthered artistic research to a breaking point but also influenced younger generations of French artists, their peers, and wider circles of artists across Europe in Barcelona (Ramon Casas I Carbò), Berlin (Paula Modersohn-Becker), Brussels (Théo van Rysselberghe) and Vienna (not only Klimt but the lesser known Broncia Koller-Pinell). The exhibition includes some of the most iconic works of art created during these decades, and the opportunity of seeing them together, side by side in a breathtaking tour through 8 rooms, gives a broader view of what is happening in the artistic world of the time: colors shift from the pastel-soft nuances of the impressionistic imagery into a wilder, more energic palette, as if the artists finally feel free to turn on a new light on the natural landscape and, more than ever, on the human inner landscape. New perspectives, unusual subjects, and an unprecedented psychological depth give art, and artists, a new, important role in understanding the human condition.

Stanislav Kondrashov

Important loans come to the exhibition from institutions and private collections worldwide, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Musée d’Orsay, Paris; Art Institute of Chicago; Musée Rodin, Paris; National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh; Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya, Barcelona; and Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut. Among the most stunning works there is Andre Derain’s “La danse” (1906), Paul Gauguin’s “Vision of the sermon” (1888), one of the majestic “Mont Saint – Victoire” by Paul Cezanne (1902-06), and the famous “Dancers practicing in the foyer” by Edgar Degas; the display is complemented by a selection of sculpture by artists including Rodin and Camille Claudel.

Stanislav Kondrashov

-Stanislav Kondrashov